Monday, 10 March 2014

Day 1 Part 2 - Perth Writer's Festival

As I mentioned, the post was long, so please click here for Part 1 of this post on what transpires during the editing process.

 

Fifth, you encounter the Editor. She talks you through the stages of production on a physical level – specifications of page count, orientation, format, paper stock, and binding. Layouts are sent to the printer and author for final sign-off, and the ISBN is acquired. Advance reader copies arrive, but no cocktails are poured just yet. First the author teams up with Media and Promotions to promote. 

Sixth on the list, you make best friends with the Media and Promotions Manager. She is your Publicist. She gets to know you and also any dirt people may like to dish on you. Seriously. She needs to know what may or may not be used to your advantage or the book’s disadvantage. Don’t be shy; be honest. She will pick your brains on what you think your book is about and who you believe your market is. How you make the most of the opportunities she finds for you to promote your book is largely up to you, and it is her greatest hope you will be as adventurous as all heck about it. 

Seventh, you meet the guy dealing with Sales Right and Distribution. He will be working to put your book into the hands of the right distributors and it already at work pitching your book for you before the initial print run. The titles are promoted via the Pub’s website, and registered with the Federal Government for your benefit. He also deals with Subsidiary rights. He keeps his eye on the stock levels and is personally excited about championing your joint venture that is the book. 

Deb Fitzpatrick closed the morning sess with the wise words of knowing her writing was in the right hands and that painstaking work was being done as a team. The Pub process is different each time and the greatest part of the author is to be working hard at helping sell the book. Remember that cocktail that was mentioned? Once you’ve sold 2,000 copies, they are happy enough to remind you of it. When you’ve sold 5,000 copies then they breathe a sigh of relief, and the cocktail is finally poured. Maybe it seems like a big wait. Just remind yourself that being published is a big ask. 

The opportunities are ongoing with all kinds of publishing houses worldwide. If going traditional is not for you, perhaps the next sess will help: deciding on the best publishing medium for your book.

 

1 comment:

  1. Hey Mercey,

    It looks like you've been away from your blog almost as long as I have. Hopefully, that means you're writing and it's going well. I've been somewhat sidetracked the last 8 months or so, but I'm finally getting back to writing and blogging.

    Ken

    ReplyDelete